Nieman Reports

Spring 2006

What Katrina Revealed, Will Journalists Now Cover?

Cover for Spring 2006

The unfortunate reality is that American journalists do not systematically or analytically cover the plight of the poor, the marginalized, the isolated, or the powerless. When we put together elaborate hurricane coverage plans, organize medical beats, determine Iraq war coverage, or decide on approaches to stories about globalization of the economy, our focus generally is on implications for the affluent and what "experts" have to say, while keeping a watchful eye on breaking news.

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Reporting on Gaps That Katrina Revisited

Remembering Those Who Are Usually Forgotten

By Reporting on Gaps That Katrina Revealed March 15, 2006

The unfortunate reality is that American journalists do not systematically or analytically cover the plight of the poor, the marginalized, the isolated, or the powerless. When we put together elaborate hurricane coverage plans, organize medical beats, determine Iraq war coverage, or decide on approaches to stories about globalization of the economy, our focus generally is on implications for the affluent and what "experts" have to say, while keeping a watchful eye on breaking news. Read more

Journalist's Trade: The Job of Frontline Editor

Newspapers' Survival

Spring 2006: Newspapers’ Survival Introduction

By Newspapers' Survival March 15, 2006

"Reinvent or die. It's that simple," is advice offered to newspapers by Tim Porter, an editor and writer with newspapers and now a news media consultant. "And the death will be slow and painful, a continuing slide into mediocrity and irrelevance, as tighter budgets reduce staff and the public opts for newer, more compelling sources of information." Porter argues that "local journalism," done in new ways that he describes, will be the difference in whether daily newspapers survive. Read more

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