Archive: Sep 2013

Robert Drew, NF ’55

By Nieman Moments September 18, 2013

A pioneer of cinéma vérité, Drew in 1960 used portable sound and film equipment he helped develop to produce “Primary.” For that documentary, Drew was granted round-the-clock access to presidential candidate John F. Kennedy during a pivotal primary … Read more

Tim Giago, NF ’91

By Nieman Moments September 18, 2013

Giago founded the Lakota Times (now Indian Country Today), the first independently owned Native American newspaper in the U.S. I first entered Walter Lippmann House filled … Read more

Geneva Overholser, NF ’86

By Nieman Moments September 18, 2013

In 1991, The Des Moines Register’s series about a rape victim won a Pulitzer for Public Service. The subject of the series, Nancy Ziegenmeyer, decided to go public after reading a column in which Overholser questioned the practice … Read more

Gene Roberts, NF ’62

By Nieman Moments September 18, 2013

Roberts worked as a reporter in North Carolina before becoming the chief Southern and civil rights correspondent for The New York Times after his Nieman year. He is co-author of Pulitzer winner “The Race Beat: The Press, the … Read more

Models of Great Coverage

By September 18, 2013

Though The New York Times lacks a beat reporter and covers the issue of mass incarceration sporadically at best, those three pieces by Tierney in early 2013 addressed two key issues. RELATED ARTICLE … Read more

How to Keep Sources Secure from Surveillance

By Watchdog September 18, 2013

In an encrypted Q&A with The New York Times Magazine, National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden warned that journalists have been slow to properly respond to the threat of government surveillance. "I was surprised to realize that there were people in news organizations who didn’t recognize any unencrypted message sent over the Internet is being delivered to every intelligence service in the world," he wrote to Peter Maass about his initial attempts to communicate with Guardian reporter Glenn Greenwald. "In the wake of this year’s disclosures, it should be clear that unencrypted journalist-source communication is unforgivably reckless." Revelations over the last few months have made it clear that the U.S. government is willing and able to use telephone and Internet records to pursue sources who leak secrets to the media, and to do so by targeting reporters, if necessary. Read more